The Cato Institute

Democrats Ask Trump Administration to Block Consumer Protections

In a recent letter to the Trump administration, leading congressional Democrats are asking the administration not to implement protections for enrollees in short-term health plans. Yes, you read that right. Dated April 12, the letter comes from Sens. Patty Murray (WA) and Ron Wyden (OR), as well …

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Upcoming Book Forum: Republic in Peril: American Empire and the Liberal Tradition

David C. Henrickson will be at Cato on Monday, April 16, at 11am to discuss his new book, Republic in Peril: American Empire and the Liberal Tradition in which he contends that American foreign policy is well over-due for “renovation.” He argues that that The …

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People Who Have Never Experienced Back Pain Have No Business Making Opioid Policy

Economist Steven Horwitz writes in The USA Today about President Trump’s proposal to reduce legal opioid prescriptions by one third. Such a drastic reduction would inevitably harm people like Horwitz, who relates his experience with excruciating back pain and how opioids were essential to relieving his …

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Are Students Today “Relatively Poorer” Than in 1971?

Former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has taken to the pages of the Washington Post to let you know that you shouldn’t listen to people who tell you that “education reform” hasn’t worked well. At least, that is, reforms that he likes—he ignores the …

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Patrick Korten, R.I.P.

I am saddened to report that Pat Korten, Cato’s vice president for communications from 1996 to 1999, died Thursday evening after suffering a stroke earlier in the week.  Pat was a personal friend of mine. We served together in the administration of President Reagan, first …

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Shulkin Out at VA

President Donald Trump has dismissed Secretary of Veterans Affairs Dr. David Shulkin amid disagreement within the administration over the future of the beleaguered  Veterans’ Health Administration, a single-payer health system whose closest analogue is the United Kingdom’s National Health Service.  In a farewell printed in the New …

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Failed ACA Reinsurance Program Shows: Government Subsidies Don't Reduce Premiums

ObamaCare turns eight years old today. Some opponents had hoped to mark the occasion by giving supporters the birthday gift they’ve always wanted: a GOP-sponsored bailout of ObamaCare-participating private insurance companies. Fortunately, a dispute over subsidies for abortion providers killed what could have been the first of …

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Study: Medical Expenses Cause Close to 4% of Personal Bankruptcies–not 60%

A new study by economists Carlos Dobkin, Amy Finkelstein, Raymond Kluender, and Matthew J. Notowidigdo – “Myth and Measurement — The Case of Medical Bankruptcies” [subscription required] – challenges the conventional wisdom on the effect of medical bills on the rate of personal bankruptcy. From …

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States & HHS Can Provide Relief from ObamaCare while Congress Dithers

Congress appears unwilling to provide any sort of ObamaCare relief.  But did you know states can exempt their residents from ObamaCare’s costliest regulations simply by letting them purchase insurance licensed by U.S. territories—i.e., across state lines?  Or that the Trump administration has the authority to …

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Public Schooling Battles: February Dispatch

February is a short month, so March caught me by surprise. Hence the late Dispatch. But if February had 31 days, it would be like this came out on March 11. Not that bad, right? Anyway, on with the February battles, which are heavy on …

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