The Cato Institute

Are Mass Shootings Becoming More Frequent?

Terrible mass shootings like the one at a Parkland, Florida high school are so shocking that it is easy to get the impression that mass shootings are increasingly common.  The number of deaths from mass shootings has been unusually high since 2007, because of five …

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Could CBO Be Underestimating GDP Growth by 1%? They’ve Done It Before

From 1983 to 1999, the CBO issued two-year forecasts that added up to a 2.7% growth rate, which would now be widely dismissed as a “rosy” forecast. Yet actual growth averaged 3.7% from 1983 to 1999 – a full percentage point higher – despite a …

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Mixed News in the Trump Education Budget

Quickly reading through the overviews of President Trump’s proposed FY 2019 budget, the good news is that funding coming through the U.S. Department of Education would be cut. The bad news is that the budget would potentially include up to $1 billion applicable to private …

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Can We PROSPER and Be Free?

A New York Times article this week tackled the “conservative social agenda” supposedly packed into the Promoting Real Opportunity, Success, and Prosperity through Education Reform (PROSPER) Act that recently moved through the House education committee. The 590-page bill is an effort to renew the Higher …

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Public Schooling Battles: January Dispatch

January brought a new year to our calendars—more on calendars shortly—but a look at the public schooling values and identity-based battles for the month shows that nothing much has really changed. Some of the big battlegrounds of 2017—and years before that—are still big battlegrounds at …

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Is Manufacturing Employment Something To Celebrate?

In his State of the Union speech, President Trump said, “Since the election, we have created 2.4 million new jobs, including 200,000 new jobs in manufacturing alone.” Is the latter good news? Politicians seem to have a fetish for manufacturing. But economists tend to be …

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Washington Post Fact Check: Tax Cuts Didn’t Raise Federal Borrowing 84%

“Trump’s tax cuts are rocketing us into the debt ceiling,” wrote Catherine Rampell in The Washington Post on February 1, because “withholding from employee paychecks will drop starting no later than mid-February. Individual income tax revenue will therefore be about $10 billion to $15 billion …

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Recapping Immigration Week on the Cato Daily Podcast

All this week, the Cato Daily Podcast (subscribe!) has tackled the myths, errors, and underappreciated elements of immigration policy. President Donald Trump has made a massive reduction in legal immigration a centerpiece of his second year in office, and the sales pitch he’s made on …

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It's Time to Put the Farm Bill Out to Pasture

Some Americans may be surprised to learn that agriculture in their country is in large part based on a five-year plan. Most commonly referred to as the farm bill, it is up for renewal this year and—just like in years past—is likely to produce a …

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DC Private Schooling: A Portrait in Diversity?

Private schools are the preserves of rich, white people, and if they weren’t around education would be more racially integrated. That’s probably the assumption many people have, and it could be what people reading about a recent Shanker Institute report on segregation in Washington, DC, …

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