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Tag Archives: The Cato Institute

Stopping Risk-Adjustment Payments and Cutting Navigator Grants Make ObamaCare Harms More Transparent

The Trump administration has announced it is suspending so-called “risk adjustment” payments to insurers who participate in ObamaCare’s Exchanges, and cutting spending on so-called “navigators,” who help (few) people enroll in ObamaCare plans.  The Washington Post’s Catherine Rampell and other ObamaCare supporters are calling these steps …

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Trump's AHPs Rule: a Generally Lousy Idea that Would Reduce Premiums for Some and Make ObamaCare's Costs More Transparent

The Trump administration has released its final rule expanding so-called association health plans. The rule would allow many consumers to avoid some of ObamaCare’s unwanted regulatory costs. But the rule also highlights both the destructive power of ObamaCare and Republicans’ utter lack of imagination when …

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Pardon My Skepticism

In his prime tweeting time, bright and early last Monday, President Trump proclaimed: “Numerous legal scholars?” I harrumphed to myself: “come on.” Given that no president has ever been crazy enough to try it, the self-pardon is a novel question of constitutional law. When I …

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Appreciating Charles Krauthammer

I was crushed by Charles Krauthammer’s moving announcement here.   When I was just out of college–many years ago now–I worked briefly as his research assistant.  He was as kind and generous in person as he is sharp and incisive in print.  What a blow …

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Public Schooling Battles: May Dispatch

Some people want schools to have lighthearted, warm environments. Some want them to delve into social commentary, even if it is uncomfortable. Some students just want to wear what they want to wear. And some people either don’t want any of those things, or disagree …

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Negative DC Voucher Results Still Don’t Mean Choice Has Failed

It’s not a good thing when a random-assignment study—the research “gold standard” because it controls even for unobservable variables like motivation—finds that using a voucher tends to result in lower standardized test scores. All things equal, we’d like scores to go up. But in the …

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Coming Soon to a Los Angeles Times Corrections Box Near You

Correction: The article “Trump’s New Insurance Rules Are Panned by Nearly Every Healthcare Group that Submitted Formal Comments” claimed the Trump administration proposes allowing short-term health insurance plans “to turn away sick people.” In fact, federal law already allows short-term plans to turn away sick …

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A Right To Try — But for How Many? And For How Long?

President Trump has signed legislation restoring the right of some terminally ill patients to determine the course of their medical treatment. This “right to try” law builds on legislation enacted by dozens of states. The federal right-to-try law is an important victory for patients and individual liberty. …

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Show Me the (Education) Money, Finale!

Long-Term, National: Money and Employees Have Poured In Now that we’ve looked at scads of data—on spending, staffing, salaries—what can we conclude about the state of resources in public schools? First, we need to recognize that the period since the Great Recession has been an …

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Richard Pipes on Property as an Institution

Richard Pipes, the great Harvard historian, has died at 94. Best known for his clear-eyed work on Russia and its Bolshevik Revolution, a topic on which so many thinkers over the past century have fallen short, Pipes also wrote a terrific 1999 book on private property …

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